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Coloring Resin Ideas
by: Trish

The EasyCast Company makes transparent liquid colors and powdered pigments made for resin - check your craft store - they may have the liquid ones - powdered ones online at: eti-usa

I also found that Pearl-Ex pigments work really well, but are also opaque.

Haven't tried any other methods, but know the above work! Good luck on the resin - let us know how it comes out!

Trish

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Coloring Resin
by: Ruth

HI- I have been using all sorts of things to color resin, including eye shadow and blush, food coloring, spices such as cinnamon, curry, red pepper, etc. My favorite is chalk or oil-free pastels. I scrape a little off the stick with an exacto knife and mix in with the resin. My favorite resin is the 5 or 30 minute clear (colorless) 2-part epoxy resin, mixed 1:1. It takes very little pigment to get a great color. Hope this helps.

PS-I always watch the sale tables for eye shadows in unusual colors. You can also use the bronze, "gold" and silver powders sold in art stores.

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Saying Thanks
by: Debra

I really want to thank you for your help I am going to start this weekend and see if I can get the yellow roses (minitures) and the gold eyeshadow to look the way I want it to look if it does I will let ya'll know. I am so excited I can hardly wait until work is over so I can go and do something I love doing.

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color for epoxy
by: Lloyd

I have doing a lot with epoxy for over 2 years. One other thing that works for dye is alcohol based permanent ink (as in caligraphy ink at craft stores. The transparent ones give a great color with just a few drops. Black and teal in particular work. The more pigmented opaque inks don't work as well.

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Coloring Resin
by: Anonymous

I've done lots of experiments, and the colorants I prefer to color resin are of the powder variety:

The best are non-oil pastels. (chalk-like.) I get good quality pastels, which come in hundreds of colors, and scrape a tiny bit of it with a craft knife. (such as Exacto)

I use Devcon 2-part Epoxy, and I prefer the 8 oz. bottles over the syringe type. It can be found in 5 minute and 20 minute (cure-time) varieties.

I put a small amount from each bottle on a piece of waxed paper. Now some people prefer to add the colorant to the epoxy puddle, mix well and then add the hardener, done with a toothpick or popsicle stick.

I prefer to mix the expoxy and the hardener first, slowly and gently to avoid introducing air. Mix thoroughly, Then I add a little bit of the pastel powder at a time, while continuing to stir. If you have the 5 minute variety, add it to your jewelry piece right way. Blow over the top through a straw to get rid of bubbles.If you used the 20 minute kind, you have a little more time.
Leave some on the waxed paper. You can inspect it after awhile to see if it has set up. Both kinds should rest undisturbed overnight.

It's possible to add seeds, spices, seed beads, etc. to the uncolored mix. Feel free to contact me with other resin related questions.
One more thing: wear gloves if you can to keep your skin from being sensitized, and wear a mask. Use good ventilation or work outdoors. Cover with a box when finished to keep dust off your work.

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More questions about Resin jewelery?
by: Jo-jo

I'm really fascinated with the idea of working with resin. Years ago I made some paperweights with a girlfriend that were made of resin. I remember it being very stinky and gave me a headache. Are all of the current products like that? Can anyone recommend one resin over another brand? Also, I would like to make resin beads, rather than cabochons in moulds? Do ahy of you experienced craft artists have any suggestions on techniques or processes to make marble size beads?As a newbie I really appreciate your recommendations!

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coloring epoxy
by: W. Lloyd Patterson

I think using chaulk sounds like a great way to do this. I have worked with epoxy extensively for 3 years. I like the 2 ton devcon. Longer work time, higher strength.

You can color epoxy with anniline dye (Rockler.com).

Using non opaque india type calligraphy inks will also do the coloring job especially if you want transpaent see though color in your item. The black, green a teal are good. The opaque white doesn't work well. Experiment, a few drops is all you'll need.


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Coloring Resin
by: Lloyd

Chaulk does work, so does the permanent inks for caligraphy. However the opaque inks don;t work so well.

I have recently found that tester hobby paint works for this.

Try very small amount of the testers to keep from getting too dark and opaque.

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Mixing Powder Pigments For Resin
by: Katherine of Resin Obsession

Mixing the powder pigments are great for color. I would suggest taking a bit of resin and adding the dry pigment to that first.

This is your 'stock' mix. Then, add a bit of that to your larger batch of resin.

Doing it this way will keep you from adding more color than you want and ruining your whole batch.

Good luck!

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Resin Colorants And The Biggest Mistake
by: SarahAsh

I read through the comments and was surprised that a few items for coloring resin weren't included.

But first, a really good rule regarding coloring resin is that adding anything to it will affect it.

Slower drying time, longer drying time, failure to cure or harden properly, stickiness, ability to remove from molds - these can all happen if you add too much of anything to it.

Therefore, whatever you use to color your resin should be in a pigment form that is at its most potent or pure. I suggest staying away from liquids since they cause the most problems.

Instead I suggest the following colorants and additives:

1. OIL PAINT- only a drop is needed to color the resin but it is such a minute amount it will not change the chemical makeup of the resin. By far the most effective and easiest to mix since its form is very similar to resin.

2. ACRYLIC PAINT- only a very minute amount as well. Use artists' quality paint, not student quality. The latter contain less pigment.

3. MICA POWDER- This can be bought online from aromatherapy stores (where you buy absolutes and essential oils to mix yourself).

Camden Grey is one place that sells pure mica powder. For those of you who use eyeshadows to color resin should definitely look into mica powder since it is the building block of eyeshadow, basically giving eyeshadow it's color.

Just be careful not to breathe it in. Again, only a very tiny amount is needed.

4. MICA SHEETS- slices or layers of mica. They are lightweight, can be broken by hand, and are translucent. Since mica is a solid, it will not affect the resin.

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Fake or Foe Beer?
by: Anonymous

I'm wanting to make fake beer to put into a beer mug. I have no idea of what type of dye to use since the resin will be deep into a mug, will it harden or dry properly? I'd like a clear golden color. I will be using resin where you mix 1:1 .

I'd appreciate any info.

I'm running out of time!

I have an exhibit in a museum to set up! Thank you!

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